When it comes to the packaging strategy duel there’s a push and pull. Let’s see how packaging is impacted when a reactive strategy comes up against a proactive one.

Proactive

When it comes to the packaging strategy duela proactive packaging strategy is one that is continuously evolving. You’re constantly looking at the market, all of your brands and what trends are beginning to take off so you can stay ahead of the curve. You evolve all your brands every few years, ensuring your message is always single minded and consistent.

The Good? You’re a step ahead of the game. Your packs are updated long before your sales results are at risk. Your competitors are constantly trying to keep up. You never rest, even when times are good. You are the market leader and forge the path for others to follow in your wake.

The Bad? Let’s be honest – there aren’t a whole lot of negatives to being proactive. If you have a solid proactive strategy you can see the risks and mitigate them before they become an issue. However, you need to ensure you don’t change too rapidly/constantly and lose your consumers on the journey.

Reactive

A reactive packaging strategy is when you’re forced to make changes to your pack. It’s as a reaction to an external factor that hadn’t been anticipated. i.e. a new health trend, a competitor update, a decline in sales. These are all reactive reasons to update your pack.

The Good? By being reactive you are able to view the whole market and see where there may be gaps. If the trend is natural – you can see what the rest of the market is doing, then ensure you have a point of difference. Find the gap.

The Bad? If you only update your packs when the situation demands, it’s a lot harder to regain lost consumers. If you’d been proactive you could have expanded your customer base and kept revenue high. You’re caught in a me too struggle? Chances are if you’re updating based on reactionary measures it’s because someone else has done it before you and now you need to catch up. The danger here, and why yo’ll likely loose the packaging strategy duel, is that you won’t stand for anything and there’s a high probability you’ve already lost your audience.

The final verdict?

It’s critical to success that you maintain a proactive approach when it comes to your packaging design. However, there does need to be a level continuum between the two. If you have an organization that is too proactive then you will be in a constant state of change – consumers won’t have time to identify with your brand. However, if you’re heavily reactive strategy it means your too slow to change and make decisions. Your packs become obsolete before you realise they need updating. You have to find balance.

Proactive A proactive packaging strategy is one that is continuously evolving. You’re constantly looking at the market, all of your brands and what trends are beginning to take off so you can stay ahead of the curve. You evolve all your brands every few years, ensuring your message is always single minded and consistent.

The Good? You’re a step ahead of the game. Your packs are updated long before your sales results are at risk. Your competitors are constantly trying to keep up. You never rest, even when times are good. You are the market leader and forge the path for others to follow in your wake.

The Bad? Let’s be honest – there aren’t a whole lot of negatives to being proactive. If you have a solid proactive strategy you can see the risks and mitigate them before they become an issue. However, you need to ensure you don’t change too rapidly/constantly and lose your consumers on the journey.

Reactive A reactive packaging strategy is when you’re forced to make changes to your pack. It’s as a reaction to an external factor that hadn’t been anticipated. i.e. a new health trend, a competitor update, a decline in sales. These are all reactive reasons to update your pack.

The Good? By being reactive you are able to view the whole market and see where there may be gaps. If the trend is natural – you can see what the rest of the market is doing, then ensure you have a point of difference. Find the gap.

The Bad? If you only update your packs when the situation demands, it’s a lot harder to regain lost consumers. If you’d been proactive you could have expanded your customer base and kept revenue high. You’re caught in a me too struggle? Chances are if you’re updating based on reactionary measures it’s because someone else has done it before you and now you need to catch up. The danger here is that you won’t stand for anything and there’s a high probability you’ve already lost your audience.

The final verdict?

It’s critical to success that you maintain a proactive approach when it comes to your packaging design. However, there does need to be a level continuum between the two. If you have an organization that is too proactive then you will be in a constant state of change – consumers won’t have time to identify with your brand. However, if you’re heavily reactive strategy it means your too slow to change and make decisions. Your packs become obsolete before you realise they need updating. You have to find balance.